Wateridge Village

Location Type Site Area Description

Ottawa, ON

Mixed-use, Mid-rise, Townhouses

323.7 Acres (131 HA)

Wateridge Village is a new mixed-use community built on the former Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Rockcliffe. The community consists of a mix of singles, semi-detached and townhouse units. Closer to the community core, building height and densities increase from low to mid-rise residential and mixed-use buildings.

  • Location Ottawa, ON

  • Type Mixed-use, Mid-rise, Townhouses

  • Site Area 323.7 Acres (131 HA)

  • Description Wateridge Village is a new mixed-use community built on the former Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Rockcliffe. The community consists of a mix of singles, semi-detached and townhouse units. Closer to the community core, building height and densities increase from low to mid-rise residential and mixed-use buildings.

Community Siteplan

Streetscape Elevation

The master plan introduces building form that is imbued with character evoking heritage buildings creating a community that has seemingly developed over time. The design of the building facades and massing introduces the use of brick and stone as a contextual link to Ottawa. These materials lay a foundation for a new vision and sense of place through the use of aluminum cladding and wood, which links the development to CFB Rockcliffe's cultural heritage.


By using metal cladding that stresses horizontal lines, the buildings evoke a large warehouse style, such as the military hangars that dotted the history of the Air Base. Sliding metal panels and metal brackets supporting awnings work to mimic bi-plane wing reinforcing straps. Large warehouse style windows and Art Deco motifs, act as throwbacks to the site's history.

Neighbourhood Mews Evening

Neighbourhoods Mews Daytime

The development creates the feeling of being right in the downtown core, on a lively street. The variety of materials, window shapes and patterns and colours greatly contribute to this liveliness, by giving each unit its own identity. Yet, it also speaks to the dynamics of growth and city-building, where new intermixes with the old as a graft of nature, by adding and integrating, as opposed to starting anew.